18

Apr

Follow Friday.

Roundup of my favorite things this week.
Follow it, don’t judge it.



Music. Galantis.
Rare is the story of a group making their live debut at a festival the magnitude of Coachella and rarer still is the story of a group that can fill that festival’s stage and have nearly every attendee sing along to songs that were released just two weeks prior. That is the story of Linus Eklow and Christian Karlsson’s Galantis, but it is a story in which everyone in the electronic sphere anxiously awaits the next chapter. With their first performance officially one for the books, these are the moments that made Galantis’live debut so special.

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Hotel. La Semilla.
I know where I’ll be next January…
Hotel La Semilla is a labor of true love and passion. Located in the heart of Playa del Carmen, Mexico this intimate hotel is the love-child of Alexis Scharer and his wife, Angie Rodriguez. They both have a history in the hotel industry and after nine years, their dream to open their own establishment became a reality.

Hotel La Semilla is inspired by the Rough Luxe movement, as Alexis shares;  “Rough Luxe embraces the imperfection created by the wear and tear of time. It’s authentic and unpretentious, reversing the past from the youthful perspective of the present.” Combining fresh white walls with furniture and details hand-selected from the flea markets around Mexico, results in a distinct interior which reflect Mexican heritage, whilst evoking a sense of comfort and homeliness.

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Class. General Assembly + Nas.
Tech has a serious diversity problem — so General Assembly (GA), the New York City private vocational school for programming and engineering, is now opening an “Opportunity Fund” to give scholarships to women, veterans, African-Americans and Latinos. The first contributors to the fund are GoogleMicrosoftHirepurpose and, well, Nas.

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16

Apr

techcrunch:

Instagram just got a whole lot more Biden. Welcome to Instagram @vp

techcrunch:

Instagram just got a whole lot more Biden. Welcome to Instagram @vp

08

Apr

Why I Deleted Tinder

Via The Literate Blonde: This morning I listened to a TED Talk in which Barry Schwartz, author of The Paradox of Choice, explained how and why the abundance of choice in modern society is actually making us miserable. And as he went on, I couldn’t help but think how his thesis related to 2 completely different but entirely similar New York experiences I’ve had recently.

Barry opened his speech discussing salad dressings in a way that exactly mirrored an incident that happened last week when I walked to the grocery store on my block to grab a bottle of ketchup. I planned to buy regular old Heinz unless there was a generic store brand that saved me some change, but when I walked into the condiment aisle, what I found would make me reconsider everything: an entire section devoted entirely to different types of ketchup. Less sodium, less sugar, ketchup with jalapeño, ketchup with balsamic vinegar, a picnic pack, dip-and-squeeze, organic, no salt, hot & spicy… and that’s just Heinz. All of a sudden, I found myself questioning what I wanted. Was there a healthier choice? Something that tasted better? How much more would it cost me, and would it be worth the cost? Would less sodium mean more sugar, and how would the spice affect the flavor of my burger?

Single in the city, I find a lot of parallels between seemingly inconsequential moments and love, sex and relationships. But one very real thing that has affected me and many of my friends both in dating and relationships is a feeling of restlessness created by FOMO (fear of missing out) and a constant uncomfortable itch whispering ‘is there something better?’

It’s no secret that 20-somethings in smaller towns and cities couple up and marry younger than in New York due to a variety of factors - in New York there’s more of a social scene, less peer pressure (or it’s less of a norm to couple up younger), more diversity in the types of people you meet, but more than anything… there are just more options. You can walk into almost any bar, at any time of any day and meet a viable candidate for a minimum of a drinks date. Download Tinder and you can scroll through potential singles for hours, able to speak to hundreds if not thousands of other singles with the swipe of a finger. With so many potential options for a partner it simply makes it harder to make a decision. And, if/once you do, you’re constantly plagued by the question: could I do better?

So, here I am in the ketchup aisle. I walked in thinking I knew exactly what I wanted and could be in and out in 5 minutes, and I’ve now been standing here for 15 minutes comparing labels. And in some regards that’s great because maybe I truly will end up with a better choice. But for now I’m paralyzed. I’m thinking of buying the reduced sugar, but I know that negative affects of sweeteners might negate the savings in calories in a much more serious way long-term. And at this point I was completely disregarding price which, in regards to the ketchup that I’m going to use sparingly and in very small qualities, is probably the most significant factor in the end. But the point is that I no longer know what I want simply because my choices were increased.

Read More

30

Mar

Tidbit: Measuring Your Life

Yesterday, I filled my Globe Trotter with previous months of Harvard Business Review, Monocle, and Fast Company, curled up in my plane pod, and hunkered down for the 14 empty hours ahead of me. In just a few short pages, pre-take-off, Clay Christensen, a professor and prolific at Harvard, touched on every topic that sit heavily on my mind. Here’s a brief excerpt from “Measuring Your Life 

How will you?

Editor’s Note: When the members of the class of 2010 entered business school, the economy was strong and their post-graduation ambitions could be limitless. Just a few weeks later, the economy went into a tailspin. They’ve spent the past two years recalibrating their worldview and their definition of success.

The students seem highly aware of how the world has changed (as the sampling of views in this article shows). In the spring, Harvard Business School’s graduating class asked HBS professor Clay Christensen to address them—but not on how to apply his principles and thinking to their post-HBS careers. The students wanted to know how to apply them to their personal lives. He shared with them a set of guidelines that have helped him find meaning in his own life. Though Christensen’s thinking comes from his deep religious faith, we believe that these are strategies anyone can use. And so we asked him to share them with the readers of HBR. To learn more about Christensen’s work, visit his HBR Author Page.

Before I published The Innovator’s Dilemma, I got a call from Andrew Grove, then the chairman of Intel. He had read one of my early papers about disruptive technology, and he asked if I could talk to his direct reports and explain my research and what it implied for Intel. Excited, I flew to Silicon Valley and showed up at the appointed time, only to have Grove say, “Look, stuff has happened. We have only 10 minutes for you. Tell us what your model of disruption means for Intel.” I said that I couldn’t—that I needed a full 30 minutes to explain the model, because only with it as context would any comments about Intel make sense. Ten minutes into my explanation, Grove interrupted: “Look, I’ve got your model. Just tell us what it means for Intel.”

I insisted that I needed 10 more minutes to describe how the process of disruption had worked its way through a very different industry, steel, so that he and his team could understand how disruption worked. I told the story of how Nucor and other steel minimills had begun by attacking the lowest end of the market—steel reinforcing bars, or rebar—and later moved up toward the high end, undercutting the traditional steel mills.

When I finished the minimill story, Grove said, “OK, I get it. What it means for Intel is…,” and then went on to articulate what would become the company’s strategy for going to the bottom of the market to launch the Celeron processor.

I’ve thought about that a million times since. If I had been suckered into telling Andy Grove what he should think about the microprocessor business, I’d have been killed. But instead of telling him what to think, I taught him how to think—and then he reached what I felt was the correct decision on his own.

That experience had a profound influence on me. When people ask what I think they should do, I rarely answer their question directly. Instead, I run the question aloud through one of my models. I’ll describe how the process in the model worked its way through an industry quite different from their own. And then, more often than not, they’ll say, “OK, I get it.” And they’ll answer their own question more insightfully than I could have.

My class at HBS is structured to help my students understand what good management theory is and how it is built. To that backbone I attach different models or theories that help students think about the various dimensions of a general manager’s job in stimulating innovation and growth. In each session we look at one company through the lenses of those theories—using them to explain how the company got into its situation and to examine what managerial actions will yield the needed results.

On the last day of class, I ask my students to turn those theoretical lenses on themselves, to find cogent answers to three questions: First, how can I be sure that I’ll be happy in my career? Second, how can I be sure that my relationships with my spouse and my family become an enduring source of happiness? Third, how can I be sure I’ll stay out of jail? Though the last question sounds lighthearted, it’s not. Two of the 32 people in my Rhodes scholar class spent time in jail. Jeff Skilling of Enron fame was a classmate of mine at HBS. These were good guys—but something in their lives sent them off in the wrong direction… More

26

Mar

Virgin Australia Business Class Kit via paulbrady.

Virgin Australia Business Class Kit via paulbrady.

25

Mar

The Innovation Class

Everything is better above 30,000 feet.

Delta Air Lines (NYSE:DAL) is launching the “Innovation Class,” designed to provide the LinkedIn community with the opportunity to meet with leaders from different fields on a designated flight. The airline will preview the concept at the TED2014 conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, on 17 March 2014.

Individuals interested in the opportunity to fly with a titan in their industry, sharing ideas and discussing goals and future projects, may submit an application at Deltainnovationclass.com. Delta will select and pair applicants with industry leaders.

Delta’s first Innovation Class in-flight pairing occurred en-route to TED2014: James Patten, CEO of Patten Studio, was awarded the opportunity to fly with influential technologist Eric Migicovsky, CEO of Pebble Technology, from Salt Lake City to Vancouver. Delta will host additional Innovation Class flights throughout 2014, including the next en-route pairing featuring Sean Brock, an Outstanding Chef finalist for The James Beard Awards in New York City on May 5. Future events and influencer pairings will be announced later this year.

"Every day Delta carries almost a half-million customers around the globe, many of whom are leaders in their respective fields of work," explains Mauricio Parise, Delta’s director - Worldwide Marketing Communications. "Innovation Class is our small contribution to enable collaboration by bringing together brilliant minds, and there is no better place to launch this program than at TED - an organization that was born to spread ideas and fuel innovation."

At the TED2014 conference, Delta will encourage attendees to learn about Innovation Class and apply for the program at the airline’s activation exhibit - Social Soul. This digital experience brings to life a user’s personal Twitter feed in a larger-than-life structure where their social media profile is on display in a 360-degree immersive stream of monitors, mirrors, and a sound system, describes a spokesperson. Afterwards, Social Soul connects the user to another TED attendee using a custom algorithm that links attendees through their similar interests. After exiting Social Soul, users may connect with other TED attendees and also apply for Delta’sInnovation Class.

Delta is the official airline sponsor of TED2014 and the only airline that features TED Talks as part of its premium entertainment onboard experience. 

20

Mar

The Fall 2014 Runways: Illustrated for Harpers Bazaar 
By my lovely, incredible sister, Amanda Weiner

The Fall 2014 Runways: Illustrated for Harpers Bazaar 

By my lovely, incredible sister, Amanda Weiner

18

Mar

Tidbit: Holi.

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If there’s one thing that has alluded me in life, it’s Holi. Try as I may, I can’t seem to make it to India in March, or take part in the magical festival festivities that bring color to Hindu communities around the world. 

Beginning with an evening bonfire on the full moon in March, festival goers sing and dance into the night. The next day is filled with colored paints and waters, thrown freely at strangers and friends alike. Celebrated as the triumph of good over evil, in India Holi is also traditionally a time when strictly separated castes can interact freely.

Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh wrote: “May the festival bring health, happiness and prosperity to all.”

And Mashable (yes, Mashable) shared these amazing images

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13

Mar

Snapshot: Rio de Janeiro, 10:36 am
He-llo. 

Snapshot: Rio de Janeiro, 10:36 am

He-llo. 

11

Mar

Travel Tuesday

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I’ve been pop-up hopping this year, so it’s apropos to pop in to Maria Santa Teresa in Rio - a guest house housed in a mid-century villa and perched at the highest point of Rio´s bohemian Santa Teresa neighborhood. Across the street from one of Rio´s top restaurants, Aprazivel, guests can choose to lounge at the hotel all day and night in calm, or take a quick ride into the city for beaches, shopping, and nightlife. Expect a Freehand Miami vibe.

For one-year only…

06

Mar

Soundbite; Wrecking Ball Caked Up Remix

SXSW, let’s do this. 

04

Mar

Inside one of the most highest hotels in the world via luxuryon

27

Feb

Young Heart’s “Strange Talk” Remix by @TheChainsmokers

Not mad about this. 

26

Feb

Inside: Summit Outside

Here’s how a roving tech conference bought a mountain, put down roots and hosted one of the world’s biggest camping trips… via @RalphLauren

Imagine a meadow nestled between mountains in the Utah Rockies, tall grasses glowing golden in the evening light. And in that meadow, there is a dinner table. It happens to be a quarter of a mile long, laden with cheese and charcuterie and extra-large flasks of whiskey to sate what would soon become a party of 900 guests.

This is not some sort of farm-to-table take on Alice in Wonderland’s mad tea party but rather a description of the latest brainchild of Summit, a community/conference series that has been described by Forbes as “the hipper Davos” and by Wired.com as “TED meets Burning Man.” The massive dinner in a field was part of the Summit Outside event, which took place in July 2013 and drew a slew of forward-thinking young business leaders, including tech entrepreneurs, platinum hit–making record producers and the leaders of groundbreaking nonprofits. During dinner, they all pitched in to slice the meat, pass the salad and pour the wine. It felt like an enormous yet intimate family picnic.

In the past, Summit has held its Summit Series events on a cruise ship in the Caribbean, for which the featured speakers included Richard Branson and Russell Simmons, and on the slopes of a high-end ski resort in the mountains of Lake Tahoe, where days full of change-the-world talks were preceded by a meditation session. But Summit Outside was different because it took place at the series’ new home. The field was in the middle of the Powder Mountain resort property, a massive acreage near Eden, Utah, purchased by Summit in spring 2013 after a much-rumored investment round from several dozen backers, including Silicon Valley and Hollywood moguls.

Washington, D.C., entrepreneur Elliot Bisnow founded Summit in 2008, when he—just 22 at the time—wanted to find a way for ambitious young people to network in uncommon settings. By 2012, his organization needed a permanent home for its fast-growing events. Greg Mauro, a Utah-based venture capitalist who had attended Summit at Sea, the aforementioned cruise, contacted Bisnow after hearing that Powder Mountain was not just for sale but also facing an acquisition bid that would allow thousands of crowded luxury properties on its slopes—a move that greatly worried devotees of the proudly unpretentious resort, which opened in 1972. Read more, on Ralph Lauren

24

Feb

Find adventure. 

Find adventure.